The Angels Grace Hospice Team

Transcript:

So we are a team and everybody has a role and, and the patient has a different relationship with my experiences, everyone on that team. We don’t all see the same patient because we’re, we’re, we’re, we’re meeting a different need. Usually social work, from my point of view, comes in a little bit later. Often, I may not even be seeing that patient. I may be talking to a family member or someone who’s out of state or a niece who’s been propping up a life that has fallen, fallen apart for her aunt who has had no children. So everyone has a job and we work with a case manager, the nurse who’s the overseer of the team. And we sort of take our lead from the case manager, who’s actually seeing the patient maybe more frequently because she or he are typically in there more times a week. And they may say, “Hey, you know, I’m noticing that so-and-so is having a, is getting sad, he’s getting sadder. Can you evaluate, can you give him some time.” You know, because there’s a difference between sadness and depression. So that’s a one way, for example, the case manager might involve the social work for an extra visit. And that’s a kind of a big part of what the psychosocial component of the team does.